Example of diamagnetic materials

Those materials which when placed in a magnetic field become weakly magnetized in a direction opposite to that of the applied field, are called as diamagnetic materials.

Example: bismuth, antimony, copper, gold, quartz, mercury, water, alcohol, air, hydrogen etc..

Reference: This article is referred from my book “electrical engineering materials” having ISBN 978-81-272-5069-0. In case of any doubt, you can put your question in the comment section.

Diamagnetic materials

Diamagnetic materials are those in which the individual atoms or molecules or ions do not possess any net magnet moment of their own.

When a sample of a diamagnetic material is placed in an external magnetic field of induction (B), a small magnetic moment is produced in each atom or molecule or ion proportional to B, but pointing in the opposite direction.

In other words, those materials which when placed in a magnetic field become weakly magnetized in a direction opposite to that of the applied field, are called as diamagnetic materials.

Example: bismuth, antimony, copper, gold, quartz, mercury etc.

Reference: This article is referred from my book “electrical engineering materials” having ISBN 978-81-272-5069-0. In case of any doubt, you can put your question in the comment section.

Application of curie law (Magnetic thermometers)

Magnetic thermometers are based on Curies law of magnetism. These thermometers are used to measure very low temperatures (< 1 K) by measuring the magnetic susceptibility of a paramagnetic substance.

Reference: This article is referred from my book “electrical engineering materials” having ISBN 978-81-272-5069-0. In case of any doubt, you can put your question in the comment section.

Atom as magnetic dipole

In an atom, electron revolves around the nucleus in a closed orbit. Since electron is a charged particle, so its orbit around the nucleus is equivalent to a current loop. When electron revolves in anticlockwise direction, the current is clockwise. Thus, upper face of the electron loop acts as south pole and lower face acts as north pole. Thus an atom behaves like a magnetic dipole.

Reference: This article is referred from my book “electrical engineering materials” having ISBN 978-81-272-5069-0